Energy Efficiency and the Cooling Imperative: Tapping the synergies with the HFC Refrigerant Phasedown under the Kigali Amendment (Webinar) - 05.09.2018

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The IEA estimates that by 2050 energy demand from space cooling will triple. Entering into force in 2019, the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol seeks to reduce the global warming impacts of air conditioners and refrigerators through reducing the use of refrigerants with strong global warming effects. Such a shift in refrigerant offers a great opportunity for energy efficiency improvements during appliance re-engineering. 

In this webinar, the World Wide Fund for Nature, the Copenhagen Center on Energy Efficiency and Topten International Group bring together key experts to provide an overview of the Kigali Amendment, highlight the importance of integrating energy efficiency within its scope, and explore how to speed up its implementation.

Panelists

Short Bio:
Jennifer Calder manages the World Wide Fund for Nature’s global work on energy efficiency. She joined the WWF in April 2018 after seven years spent working at the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), working on issues related to climate mitigation and policy measures to accelerate the decarbonisation of OECD economies. Jennifer holds a Masters Degree in Environment, Politics and Globalisation from King's College London (UK) as well as a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science from the University of York (UK).
Short Bio:
Xianli Zhu has a Phd in economics. She specialises in energy efficiency potential assessment, policy analysis, and best practices at UDP/C2E2. Her work includes capacity building for developing countries and academic research. She has worked in the UNEP DTU Partnership for 10 years. Previously, her key working areas included Clean Development Mechanism, Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions, Low Carbon Development Strategies, national climate and mitigation policies, climate change adaptation technologies, international climate change negotiation and governance, and life-cycle energy analysis. She worked in Beijing at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences in Beijing before joining UDP in 2006. Energy and climate policies in China are always one of her key expertise area. She has also worked in India, Vietnam, Mongolia, Cambodia, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, as well as Fiji, Vanuatu, Samoa, and some other countries in Asia and the Pacific.
Short Bio:
Hélène Rochat is an energy efficiency project manager at Topten. As an expert on appliances she works on policy related matters for the EU Ecodesign and Energy Label regulations to promote energy efficient products. Her work involves research on products, their markets, development and product testing to achieve better regulation. A Swiss national, she is fluent in English, French, Italian and German. She holds a Master in Environmental Sciences (MSc. ETH) from the ETH Zurich. She is a member of the TEAP Energy Efficiency Task Force, a task force to investigate the challenges and opportunities for energy efficiency during the phase-down of HFCs in the context of the Kigali Amendment.
Short Bio:
Dan Hamza-Goodacre has over 20 years’ experience working on climate and sustainable development. Previous roles include the Director of Buildings & Industry at ClimateWorks and the Deputy CEO of PwC’s Climate and Development Knowledge Network. Dan held various senior posts in UK government, notably at Defra and the UK Foreign Office. He is a regular speaker and moderator at conferences and has written widely on climate and development. He holds an MSc in International Development from Bristol University, where he also was a lecturer and researcher in global environmental politics. He has lived and worked in Latin American rainforests and volunteers in schools to support their ‘green’ teams.
Short Bio:
Paul Kellet manages UN Environment’s global ‘United for Efficiency’ (U4E) programme that is transforming developing and emerging markets to more energy-efficient appliances and equipment. Paul has been involved in energy efficiency and renewable energy projects over the past 20 years. This included 10 years managing Irish Energy Centre programmes and as the Manager of the Irish National Renewable Energy Programme. He received the EU Commission’s award for technology diffusion in 2003, The European Energy Award, for establishing the framework for 40% renewable electricity in Ireland from a zero base. Paul is a Mechanical Engineer from the National University of Ireland.
Short Bio:
Tim Grabiel is an experienced environmental lawyer based in Paris, France. He joined the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) in 2011, providing legal and policy advocacy at the European Union and international levels, including at the Montreal Protocol. Prior to joining EIA, Tim spent 1.5 years working in Brussels and 6 years working in the United States on environmental law and taught as an adjunct professor at Sciences Po-Le Havre in France. Tim is a law graduate of New York University (NYU) School of Law and received his undergraduate degree in Economics/International Area Studies from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

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